Ian Walker's work

Here is a detailed CV [PDF] - this is probably the best thing to read if you want to see what I do.

Ian Walker is based at the University of Bath's psychology department specialising in traffic, transport and environmental behavours, and data analysis. Before this he was a researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig, having taken BSc and DPhil degrees at the University of York. In the past he has also worked as a psychology lecturer for the Dyslexia Institute.

Ian divides his time between traffic, transport and environmental issues. The traffic research focuses particularly on the safety of vulnerable road users and their interactions with motorists, considering such issues as road user attitudes and stereotypes, and the roles of urban design and policy in affecting vulnerable road users' safety.

Ian's transport and environmental work looks particularly at unconscious or low-awareness motives for behaviour such as social norms and habits - reasons for behaviour that people cannot or will not readily discuss. Such work can inform interventions to change travel behaviour or reduce energy consumption. This work includes research on the design of home information systems and smart meters

Ian is a founder member of the European Union's COST group on bicycle helmet research and previously was a member of the COST group on motorcycle helmet research and standards. He is also a founder member of the Centre for Transport and Psychology. The New York Times selected Ian's work on driver-bicyclist interactions as one of the ideas that defined 2006.

Research interests
Ian's research interests are quite varied (largely owing to an inability to say no to any offer that sounds interesting!), but focus mostly on the roles of identity, social norms and habit in environmental behaviours - particularly travel behaviours - and in road safety settings.

Curriculum Vitae

Here is a copy of my CV which should be quite up to date.

Teaching

  • Undergraduate statistics
  • Undergraduate traffic & transport psychology (advanced unit)
  • Doctoral-level statistics

Links